May 14, 2013
"I am a lesbian woman of Color whose children eat regularly because I work in a university. If their full bellies make me fail to recognize my commonality with a woman of Color whose children do not eat because she cannot find work, or who has no children because her insides are rotted from home abortions and sterilization; if I fail to recognize the lesbian who chooses not to have children, the woman who remains closeted because her homophobic community is her only life support, the woman who chooses silence instead of another death, the woman who is terrified lest my anger trigger the explosion of hers; if I fail to recognize them as other faces of myself, then I am contributing not only to each of their oppressions but also to my own, and the anger which stands between us, then must be used for clarity and mutual empowerment, not for evasion by guilt or for further separation."

Audre Lorde, “The Uses of Anger,” Sister Outsider, p. 123

December 15, 2012
Racialicious: Racialicious Crush Of The Week: Tamura Lomax

racialicious:

image

At the R’s main blog, The Feminist Wire’s Tamura Lomax and I chat about, among other things, the morphing stereotypes of Black women and the shifting ideas of what a PhD confers as far as expertise in this digital era.

In this second part of the interview, Tamura and I talk about the…

November 21, 2012
"…In my book, Moral Combat: Black Atheists, Gender Politics, and the Values Wars, I argued that the literature on secularism and gender does not capture the experiences of women of color negotiating racism, sexism, and poverty in historically religious communities. The relative dearth of secular humanist and freethought traditions amongst women of color cannot be separated from the broader context of white supremacy, gender politics, and racial segregation. Harlem Renaissance-era writers Nella Larsen and Zora Neale Hurston are generally acknowledged as pioneering twentieth century black women freethinkers. Yet what few women’s freethought histories there are celebrate the political influence of prominent nineteenth century white women non-believers, many of whom were suffragists and abolitionists. None contextualize these women’s influence vis-à-vis the race and gender politics that shaped both the feminist and freethought movements…"

~ Sikivu Hutchinson, “Leaving Jesus: Women of Color Beyond Faith,” for The Feminist Wire

http://thefeministwire.com/2012/11/leaving-jesus-women-of-color-beyond-faith/

June 9, 2012
Liberation from Within: FREE Women of Color Healing and Activism Retreat in Denver

liberationfromwithin:

Day Three of three days of events focused on eradicating and healing from Gender-Based Violence in Denver, Colorado (http://bit.ly/LjgPLi).

TODAY —> There will be a women of color healing and activism retreat, which will focus on spiritual and ritual healing resources for women of color. This retreat, for women of color, will highlight the resources and tools I have used and continue to use on my ongoing healing journey from victim to survivor; and Sofia Chavez Frederick who will (re)introduce participants to Curanderismo and Ancient Traditions. (s/o Denver Chapter, INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence)

The FREE retreat will be held from 10:00 am - 4:00 pm (food will be provided) at the University Park United Methodist Church, 2180 S. University Boulevard, Denver, CO 80210

REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. Please contact: DenverNo2012@gmail.com or call 303.931.9737

June 8, 2012
TONIGHT Aishah Shahidah Simmons will read from Queering Sexual Violence

Day Two of three days of events focused on eradicating and healing from Gender-Based Violence in Denver, Colorado (http://bit.ly/LjgPLi).

TONIGHT just us at Redline Denver where I will read from my essay for the forthcoming anthology Queering Sexual Violence (h/t Bones Patterson). A reception will follow. Also, check out the featured exhibit, “Off the Beaten Path: Violence, Women, and Art,” 7pm at 2350 Arapahoe Street, Denver, CO 80205 

It took a village to make this happen, but I want to extend my ongoing gratitude to my beloved Sistren Linda Mizell and Rachel Elizabeth Harding for taking the lead in February 2012; and Carolyn Cunningham Ash for her generous hospitality in her beautiful home…

THE INTERSECTIONAL SPONSORS:
* Veterans of Hope 
* INCITE! Denver
* Su Teatro
* African American Studies Program at Metro State
* Brother Jeff’s Cultural Center
* Community Re-entry Project
* Coy Cunningham Memorial Scholarship Fund
* Denver Center for Crime Victims
* Ethnic Studies Dept at UCD
* It Takes a Village
* Rape Assistance and Awareness Program 
* Redline Denver

June 4, 2012
Aishah Shahidah Simmons, NO! The Rape Documentary, and Healing in Denver, Colorado

Three days of events focusing on both eradicating gender-based violence and healing from gender-based violence, featuring Aishah Shahidah Simmons and her cultural work in Denver Colorado from June 7, 2012 - June 9, 2012.

On Thursday, June 7, 2012, ‘XicanIndie Thursday’ presents:

A screening and discussion of NO! The Rape Documentary, the award-winning, internationally-acclaimed, groundbreaking feature length documentary, which explores the international atrocity of rape and sexual violence through the first testimonies of Black women survivors, the scholarship, activism, and cultural work of African-American women and men.

The screening will be held at 7pm at the Su Teatro Cultural and Performing Arts Center. Doors open at 6:30pm

721 Sante Fe Drive, Denver, CO 80204

Admission: $7 (Call Tanya for info on discounted & community tickets 303.296.0219)

On Friday, June 8, 2012, at Redline Denver, Aishah will read from her essay for the forthcoming anthology Queering Sexual Violence. A reception will follow the reading. There is also an exhibit “Off the Beaten Path: Violence, Women and Art.”

The reading will begin at 7pm.

2350 Arapahoe Street, Denver, CO 80205

On Saturday, June 9, 2012, there will be a healing and activism retreat, which will focus on spiritual and ritual healing resources for women of color. This retreat, for women of color, will highlight the tools Aishah Shahidah Simmons has used and uses on her ongoing healing journey from victim to survivor; and Sofia Chavez Frederick who will (re)introduce participants to Curanderismo and Ancient Traditions.

The retreat will be held from 10:00 am - 4:00 pm at the University Park United Methodist Church, 2180 S. University Boulevard, Denver, CO 80210

REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED. Please contact: DenverNo2012@gmail.com or call 303.931.9737

These three events are made possible through the support of:

  • Veterans of Hope
  • INCITE! Denver
  • Su Teatro
  • African American Studies Program at Metro State
  • Brother Jeff’s Cultural Center
  • Community Re-entry Project
  • Coy Cunningham Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Denver Center for Crime Victims
  • Ethnic Studies Department at University of Colorado, Denver
  • It Takes A Village
  • Rape Assistance and Awareness Program
  • Redline Denver

April 24, 2012
"

"…Where were the “I Am Nafissatou Diallo” campaigns in the same way that there were “I am Troy Davis” campaigns? Isn’t she as much a part of our non-monolithic communities as Troy Davis was? Why do we continue to act as if racism is something that only impacts Black straight men and boys? Nafissatou Diallo was a victim of both racism and sexism.

I long for the day when all of us, regardless of if we’ve been raped, molested, and/or assaulted or not will begin to publicly identify with rape victim/survivors. I believe it is very important to support those women of color victim/survivors who have the ability and courage to come forward and risk being metaphorically raped again by the court of racist/sexist/misogynist public opinion, the media, and their own racial/cultural communities, not to mention the legal defense team of the (alleged) rapist. What would it look like if we had “I Am…” campaigns for Black women rape survivors in the same way we have had them for straight Black men who’ve been brutalized and murdered by white supremacist and/or state sanctioned violence?” ~ Aishah Shahidah Simmons, “Who Will Revere US? (Black LGTBQ People, Straight Women, and Girls) (Part 2)” for The Feminist Wire

"

Read part two of this four-part article in its entirety HERE

http://thefeministwire.com/2012/04/who-will-revere-us-black-lgtbq-people-straight-women-and-girls-part-2/

Read part one of this four-part article in its entirety HERE

http://thefeministwire.com/2012/04/who-will-revere-us-black-lgtbq-people-straight-women-and-girls-part-1/

February 17, 2012
Grateful to Lisa Factora-Borchers for this powerful and necessary gift!!!

Grateful to Lisa Factora-Borchers for this powerful and necessary gift!!!

October 18, 2011
"“We call social justice movements to develop strategies and analysis that address both state AND interpersonal violence, particularly violence against women. Currently, activists/movements that address state violence (such as anti-prison, anti-police brutality groups) often work in isolation from activists/movements that address domestic and sexual violence. The result is that women of color, who suffer disproportionately from both state and interpersonal violence, have become marginalized within these movements. It is critical that we develop responses to gender violence that do not depend on a sexist, racist, classist, and homophobic criminal justice system. It is also important that we develop strategies that challenge the criminal justice system and that also provide safety for survivors of sexual and domestic violence. To live violence free-lives, we must develop holistic strategies for addressing violence that speak to the intersection of all forms of oppression…”
~ Excerpt from INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence and Critical Resistance’s joint statement on Gender Violence and the Prison Industrial Complex (2001)… It’s STILL RELEVANT 10-years later~"

CLICK HERE to learn more about INCITE!: Women of Color Against Violence (Blog)

CLICK HERE to learn more about Critical Resistance

CLICK HERE to read the Statement Gender Violence and the Prison Industrial Complex in its entirety

October 10, 2011
"

I’d also like to know who is “we” in this scenario. Because it’s definitely not white women as a whole, and you’re definitely not speaking on behalf of all SlutWalk organizers, nor even all the SlutWalk organizers from NYC.

The issue here isn’t simply ONE woman holding a sign. It is the repeated dismissal of Women of Color’s concerns throughout the organizing process, from the beginning of the Toronto SlutWalk until now. It is the pat excuses given for the sign holder’s actions. It is the refusal to acknowledge error, take responsibility, and apologize without undercutting sincerity with defensiveness. It’s the ignorant and racist comments/responses to the pain that sign (and the dismissal of other concerns) caused MANY people for VARIOUS reasons — all of which should have been and should be taken seriously and given adequate value and respect in a timely fashion. But they weren’t. (Still aren’t, as this newly established Page demonstrates *SlutWalk USA*.)

I find it enormously ironic that SlutWalk claims to want to hold perpetrators of rape culture accountable for their actions, yet many of the organizers and attendees can’t seem to understand that they, too, need to demonstrate the same level of accountability to Women of Color (and other excluded/de-centered groups) for the work to undo white supremacy and racism (and other ignored -isms).

As the organizers of a march where a White woman felt entitled to hold a racist sign, YES, they are responsible to some degree for not ensuring the safety of Black women (particularly after having JUST received an Open Letter telling them that many Black women did not feel safe there). To that end, (to echo Aishah), the use of the “N” word doesn’t make it safe for ALL OF US. (!)

On that note, the use of that word was NOT appropriate in this context and should NOT have been accepted. It should have been recognized as a problem by more people than a WOC ally of the SlutWalk organizers. But it wasn’t — at least not enough of a problem to tell the woman to ditch the sign. Using the N-word is not simply about making some people uncomfortable. It is a threat that comes laden with a history of rape, lynching, slavery, and the dehumanization of Black people in this country. It is a reminder of the reality that People of Color have been and continue to be brutalized by white people, individually and systemically.

Just ONE week before SlutWalk, a Black man (Troy Davis) was effectively lynched in Georgia. The Supreme Court of the US and the citizens of this country allowed this to happen — despite widespread protest and media coverage. THAT is what the N-word means IN THIS CONTEXT. It means not fully human. It means expendable. It means the erasure of Black women from the category of “woman.” THAT is totally unacceptable and inappropriate, and it’s disturbing that a white person would defend it so vehemently.

If SlutWalk’s goal is to end rape, then it damn well better figure out how to speak to everyone. Otherwise, it’s not only counterintuitive (seeing as Black women are raped, Latinas are raped, Native American women are raped, Asian women are raped, Middle Eastern women are raped) but it’s also just as broken and problematic as the rape culture it claims to be resisting, which is a culture that is fed by racism (e.g. the myth of the Black rapist, the fact that WOC are more frequent victims of rape, etc).

So, who exactly does SlutWalk think is valuable enough to gain the prize of NOT being raped?” ~ Mandy Van Deven ~

"

Mandy Van Deven

CLICK HERE TO READ THE SLUTWALK USA THREAD (on Facebook) 


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