April 17, 2014
#422 Pre-birthday cut! 45 here I come!

#422 Pre-birthday cut! 45 here I come!

12:41pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZrRgJy1DJXRkX
  
Filed under: 422 
April 14, 2014
On Trigger Warnings, Part I: In the Creative Writing Classroom | ENTROPY

Part One of a three-part  Electronic Roundtable Dialogue with Megan Milks, Andrea Lawlor, Sarah Schulman, CA Conrad, Jos Charles, Aishah Shahidah Simmons, and Anna Joy Springer 

As the debate on trigger warnings in the academy rages across the internet, I wondered how it’s taking shape in the creative writing classroom—so I invited six >writers/artists and educators to participate in a roundtable conversation via email. Over a period of about a week, our discussion of trigger warnings in the classroom expanded to confront issues related to censorship, accessibility, and generational tensions. The conversation was broad ranging and quite moving; sometimes polarized and always provocative. This is the first of three parts.   Megan Milks

”...Personally, I feel like my life’s work could be viewed as one big “trigger warning!” I am an incest and rape survivor. I’m very public about these aspects of my identity. For the past 22-years and counting, I’ve been in therapy with Clara Whaley-Perkins, Ph.D., a Black feminist licensed clinical psychologist and author who specializes in trauma. I talk about sexual violence more often than not. With that shared, I *still* get triggered. After years of therapy and a 12-year meditative practice, I have tools that I use to prevent me from staying triggered. Whenever possible (and often it’s not, especially in Hollywood films), I appreciate knowing in advance that this may happen. I like to know when I’m going to read about it or see it on screen. I don’t shy away from it at all. However, here are times when I like to use my privilege in the midst of my marginalization to decide that “this” may not be the best time. Chances are I will return to it especially if it’s not gratuitous gender-based, misogynist, homophobic/transphobic, and racist cinematic violence. I also recognize that this is a privilege to decide this. After being repeatedly molested as a child and raped as a young woman, I want the right to be able to decide, “if now is a good time…”

In the specific instances of both non-fiction writing and non-fiction filmmaking, I believe it is important that we witness the written and onscreen testimonials. If these courageous cis/trans women and men are able to write and/or speak about what they endured, I believe it’s important that we read and listen to their words….” ~ Aishah Shahidah Simmons


http://entropymag.org/on-trigger-warnings-part-i-in-the-creative-writing-classroom/

April 14, 2014
The Men Who Left Were White by Josie Duffy (Absentee Fatherhood in Black communities began during Slavery)


http://gawker.com/the-men-who-left-were-white-1562473547



April 11, 2014
How Does A Sister To A Rape Survivor Heal?

#SAAM #BelieveSurvivors #NOtheRapeDocumentary #ALongWalkHome #Sisterhood

(photo: Joan Brannon)

"…Fall 1996 Salamishah (Tillet) told me over the phone about her sexual assaults and that she was a multiple survivor. I was frustrated. I didn’t know what to actually do when she told me that she was raped. Should we talk about it? I didn’t know what to do. Two years later in a social documentary class at Rutgers University, I asked Salamshah if I could do a documentation of her healing process…How does a sister to a survivor heal as well? That’s one thing I learned. Not only was it easier to talk about her healing, look at her healing, but how do I heal as a survivor’s sister and break that silence and begin to talk about it with my sister and help her heal?” ~ Scheherazade Tillet , Visionary Photographer, Co-Founder & Executive Director of A Long Walk Home, Inc. in NOtheRapeDocumentary.org

How Does A Sister To A Rape Survivor Heal? She co-founds and executive directs an organization that educates and empowers young women to work towards eradicating a rape culture!

April 10, 2014
The Role of Black Clergy in Violence Against Black Women

#SAAM #BelieveSurvivors #NOtheRapeDocumentary #BlackClergy

photo credit: Joan Brannon

"Unfortunately, many leaders of Black communities, who are often clergy stand with Black males, even Black males who have committed, even in some cases as in the case of (Mike) Tyson, have been convicted of raping Black women. It’s a tremendous betrayal of Black women. It’s a betrayal of Black women who have been raped. It is a way of saying that there experience doesn’t matter. In churches it is a way of saying that Black women should sacrifice themselves, sacrifice their needs, sacrifice their dignity to the Black community, to the Black man.” ~ Rev. Traci C. West, Ph.D., Black Feminist Theologian/Scholar/Activist & Author of Wounds of the Spirit: Black Women, Violence, and Resistance Ethics (& many other titles) in NOtheRapeDocumentary.org

April 9, 2014
Screening of NO! The Rape Documentary and Discussion with Aishah Shahidah Simmons at Chicago Theological Seminary on Thursday, April 10, 2014 at 6:00pm.
This event is presented by Chicago Theological Seminary ,The Center for African American Ministries and Black Church Studies Of McCormick Theological Seminary and The Rev. Dr. Albert “Pete” Pero, Jr. Multicultural Center of Lutheran School of Theology

Screening of NO! The Rape Documentary and Discussion with Aishah Shahidah Simmons at Chicago Theological Seminary on Thursday, April 10, 2014 at 6:00pm.

This event is presented by Chicago Theological Seminary ,The Center for African American Ministries and Black Church Studies Of McCormick Theological Seminary and The Rev. Dr. Albert “Pete” Pero, Jr. Multicultural Center of Lutheran School of Theology

April 9, 2014
Black Lesbians Have Been at the Forefront of Raising Black Sexual Politics

#SAAM #BelieveSurvivors #NOtheRapeDocumentary #BlackLesbians


Barbara Smith and Aishah Shahidah Simmons (photo credit: Joan Brannon, 1999)

"Black lesbians have definitely been at the forefront of raising issues of sexual politics in the Black community generally and also working on issues violence against women. Since we are outcasts anyway, of course we’re going to speak out on principle and for justice and against oppression whatever the results are because it’s not like we’re ever going to be that acceptable.” ~ Barbara Smith, Co-Founder, Combahee River Collective (1974), Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press, & Council Member, Albany, NY in NOtheRapeDocumentary.org 



April 8, 2014
Black Women, Racial Solidarity, and Rape

#SAAM #BelieveSurvivors #NOtheRapeDocumentary

image

Charlotte Pierce-Baker, Ph.D., (photo credit: Joan Brannon)


“We are taught that we are first Black, then women. Our families have taught us this, and society in its harsh racial lessons reinforces it. Black women have survived by keeping quiet not solely out of shame, but out of a need to preserve the race and its image. In our attempts to preserve racial pride, we Black women have sacrificed our own souls.” ~ Charlotte Pierce-Baker, Ph.D., Author, Surviving the Silence: Black Women’s Stories of Rape in NOtheRapeDocumentary.org/

April 8, 2014
The Rape and Sexual Assault of Black Girls

#SAAM #BelieveSurvivors #NOtheRapeDocumentary

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Rev. Reanae McNeal (photo credit: Wadia L. Gardiner)

"Little Black girls are victimized and compromised and put to the side and sacrificed because we don’t want to break the silence because it would hurt a family friend. We might find out that Uncle Jake is not so nice. We might find out about a father. We might find out about a brother. If we don’t break the silence around that, around little Black girls being sexually abused and assaulted, then what we say, in essence in our silence, is here have my little Black girl child and murder her emotionally, physically, mentally and spiritually and I’ll sit and say nothing. That’s the biggest betrayal that any child in the world can have.” ~ Rev. Reanae McNeal, Cultural Worker Extraordinaire & Scholar in NOtheRapeDocumentary.org

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(photo credit: Gail M. Lloyd)

April 5, 2014
(Intra-Racial) Rape assaults Every One of Us in Black Communities

#SAAM #BelieveSurvivors #NOtheRapeDocumentary

photo credit: Joan Brannon

"Every rape is an assault against every one of us as a people. It also means that we are crippling, we are crippling are own folk. And because we’re focusing this conversation on intra-rape, it means we are crippling our own folk at our own hands. There’s enough out there to cripple us. Racism wakes up every day and begins to cripple us. With unequal access to decent education, unequal access to good health care, unequal access to jobs for which we are qualified, unequal access to affordable housing. Now we’re going to add stuff that we create? Not all on our own because again any violence, which we commit against each other must be understood within the larger context of the political, economic and the social conditions of this nation." ~ Johnnetta Betsch Cole, PhD, Big Sister/Friend, President Emerita, Spelman College and Bennett College for Women interviewed in NOtheRapeDocumentary.org

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