September 17, 2014
This June 2007 photograph of #GraceLeeBoggs, #AndreaJRitchie, and I was taken in in June 2007 at a joint book signing at the Allied Media Conference in Detroit, Michigan. Grace was signing her book “Living For Change: An Autobiography,” and Andrea Ritchie and I were signing “Color of Violence: The INCITE Anthology.” We had a great time together. 

Sister Grace is in hospice care. Please keep her in the places that are sacred in your life. She is a living legend, a true American Revolutionary, who, at 99 years of age, has consistently walked the talk of peace, justice, freedom, dignity, hardcore grassroots organizing and intergenerational work for decades. 

If you haven’t seen the PBS Documentary, “American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs, please make it your business to see it: http://americanrevolutionaryfilm.com

Cards and other thoughts are accepted at the Boggs Center, 3061 Field St, Detroit, MI 48214

This June 2007 photograph of #GraceLeeBoggs, #AndreaJRitchie, and I was taken in in June 2007 at a joint book signing at the Allied Media Conference in Detroit, Michigan. Grace was signing her book “Living For Change: An Autobiography,” and Andrea Ritchie and I were signing “Color of Violence: The INCITE Anthology.” We had a great time together.

Sister Grace is in hospice care. Please keep her in the places that are sacred in your life. She is a living legend, a true American Revolutionary, who, at 99 years of age, has consistently walked the talk of peace, justice, freedom, dignity, hardcore grassroots organizing and intergenerational work for decades.

If you haven’t seen the PBS Documentary, “American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs, please make it your business to see it: http://americanrevolutionaryfilm.com

Cards and other thoughts are accepted at the Boggs Center, 3061 Field St, Detroit, MI 48214

September 17, 2014
This photograph of Sister #GraceLeeBoggs and I was taken in April 2010 at Uncle Vincent Harding’s home in Denver, CO when we gathered to learn from and share with Sister Grace. 

Sister Grace is in hospice care. Please keep her in the places that are sacred in your life. She is a living legend, a true American Revolutionary, who, at 99 years of age, has consistently walked the talk of peace, justice, freedom, dignity, hardcore grassroots organizing and intergenerational work for decades. 

If you haven’t seen the PBS Documentary, “American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs, please make it your business to see it: http://americanrevolutionaryfilm.com

Cards and other thoughts are accepted at the Boggs Center, 3061 Field St, Detroit, MI 48214

This photograph of Sister #GraceLeeBoggs and I was taken in April 2010 at Uncle Vincent Harding’s home in Denver, CO when we gathered to learn from and share with Sister Grace.

Sister Grace is in hospice care. Please keep her in the places that are sacred in your life. She is a living legend, a true American Revolutionary, who, at 99 years of age, has consistently walked the talk of peace, justice, freedom, dignity, hardcore grassroots organizing and intergenerational work for decades.

If you haven’t seen the PBS Documentary, “American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs, please make it your business to see it: http://americanrevolutionaryfilm.com

Cards and other thoughts are accepted at the Boggs Center, 3061 Field St, Detroit, MI 48214

5:14pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZrRgJy1R2oys3
  
Filed under: graceleeboggs 
September 16, 2014
Acknowledge and celebrate those women and men upon whose shoulders you and your work stand!

Acknowledge and celebrate those women and men upon whose shoulders you and your work stand!

September 16, 2014
"

As aggressive acts of white racist violence intensify around us, aimed primarily but not exclusively at Black males (remember Eleanor Bumpers and Yvonne Smallwood)*, violence against Black women, both reported and unreported, intensifies within our communities. It is time to pump up the volume again around this wasteful secret and not hide from it under a cloak of false unity, not turn away from it, believe it will be solved by somebody else.

Black women will no longer accept being slaughtered like sheep on the alters of Black male frustration. On the other hand, we do not want to have to blow away Black men in our own self-defense. So Black women and men must devise ways of working together as a people to end this slaughter. We need each other too much to be destroying each other. We need each other too much, genuinely, as Black people unafraid of each other.

Each one of us can have some input into the lives of young Black boys who are part of our future. Each one of us has a voice than can be heard, and that voice must be used. Every Black person in this country is responsible in some way for teaching our sons that their manhood cannot lie within a pool of Black women’s blood.

And increasingly, there are Black male voices being raised with this lesson. In an extremely thorough and considered study of rape in Black communities, Kalamu ya Salaam noted, “[Black] women revolting and [Black] men made conscious of their responsibility to fight sexism will collectively stop rape.

We need to talk about what we do to each other, no matter what pain and anger may be mined within those conversations. This poem [Need] is as good a place as any to begin. We are too important to each other to waster ourselves in silence.
‘We CANNOT LIVE WITHOUT OUR LIVES’
Audre Lorde,
St. Croix,
August 31, 1989

"

Excerpt from: Preface To A New Edition of Need: A Chorale For Black Woman Voices by Audre Lorde

I Am Your Sister: Collected and Unpublished Writings by Audre Lorde, edited by Rudolph P. Byrd, Johnnetta Betsch Cole, and Beverly Guy-Sheftall (Oxford University Press, 2009)

Notes:

1).Eleanor Bumbpurs, sixty-seven-years-old Black grandmother, [was] murdered in 1984 in her own apartment by New York City housing policemen with a shotgun, during eviction for being one month behind in her rent in public housing. Yvonne Smallwood [was] beaten to death by New York City policemen on a Manhattan street corner over a traffic ticket given to her boyfriend.

2). Kalamu ya Salaam, “Rape: A Radical Analysis from an African-American Perspective, “in Our Women Keep Our Skies from Falling (Nkombo, 1980), 25-41.

September 16, 2014
"

As Black people, we cannot begin our dialogue by denying the oppressive nature of male privilege. And if Black males choose to assume that privilege, for whatever reason, raping, brutalizing, and killing women, then we cannot ignore Black male oppression. One oppression does not justify another.

As a people, we should most certainly work together to end our common oppression, and toward a future which is viable for us all. In that context, it is shortsighted to believe that Black men alone are to blame for the above situations, in a society dominated by white male privilege. But the Black male-consciousness must be raised so that he realizes that sexism and woman-hating are critically dysfunctional to his liberation as a Black man because they arise out of the same constellation that engenders racism and homophobia., a constellation of intolerance for difference. Until this is done, he will view sexism and the destruction of Black women only as tangential to the cause of Black liberation rather than as central to that struggle, and as long as this occurs, we will never be able to embark upon that dialogue between Black women and Black men that is so essential to our survival as a people. And this continued blindness between us can only serve the oppressive system within which we live. ~ Audre Lorde, 1979

"

My Words Will Be There (originally written in 1979)

I Am Your Sister: The Collected and Unpublished Writings of Audre Lorde, edited by Rudolph P. Byrd, Johnnetta Betsch Cole, and Beverly Guy-Sheftall (Oxford Press, 2009)

September 15, 2014
Re-Membering the 51st Anniversary of A White Supremacist Terrorist Attack in Birmingham, Alabama

Fifty-One Years  ago today (September 15, 2014) a #Terrorist Organization (Ku Klux Klan) bombed the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham Alabama. The church was destroyed and four young girls — Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, Cynthia Wesley and Addie Mae Collins- were murdered. There was a fifth young girl who was not murdered but severely injured. She is now an adult still living with PTSD. Her name is Sarah Collins Rudolph and she is Addie Mae Collins’ cousin. Last year, Democracy Now! interviewed Sarah Collins Rudolph on the 50th anniversary of this #WhiteSupremacistTerrorist attack because she has never received any compensation for the physical, mental, and emotional effects from the bombing.

Let Us NEVER FORGET that TERRORISM has been an integral part of the fiber of the United States since its founding, which began with the brutal confiscation of Indigenous land, the Genocide of Indigenous Peoples and the Enslavement of African People for centuries.

 JUSTICE for Sarah Collins Rudolph!!!!

September 10, 2014

Serena Williams is beautiful and powerful. #Flawless

September 10, 2014
"

Black men. Fellas. Brothers.

I need you to stop complaining about Ray Rice’s (much deserved and yet woefully insufficient punishment) RIGHT NOW.

When we - Black men are beaten, slain, left in the street and otherwise persecuted our sisters, our mothers, our women stand for us with nearly unilateral unwavering support. They march for us. They cry out our names and demand justice. They support us in our moments of quiet fear when we shed the bitter shameful tears of self-doubt and fatigue. If you cannot find it within you to get over your idol worship and stand up for our sisters when they are being abused and mistreated then you need to spend some serious time in reflection.

STOP looking for reasons to diminish Ray Rice’s actions.

'Well…it couldn't have been that bad. She married him.'
It doesn’t matter.

'She should know he's a big man and if provoked he's gonna hit back.'
It doesn’t matter.

'She charged at him.'
It doesn’t matter.

'She hit him first.'
It doesn’t matter.

'He's trained to hit. He can't stop it. It's a reflex.'
Are you f*cking kidding me. That’s absurd and even if it were true, IT DOESN’T MATTER.

When you say these kinds of things – when you look for ways to go easy on Ray Rice when you claim he’s ‘already been punished’ you do two things – first you tell black women “Your lives and your sense of safety have less value to me than the recreational sports entertainment I watch ritually.” You tell the women who stand for you- cry for you- demand justice for you ––”thanks for all that but don’t mess with my game” You deny them any hope of feeling safe with you. You reinforce the perception that they are ALONE in their struggle. Which in turn signals to those who would further victimize them (you know- general society that places Black women at the very bottom of valued humans) that they are free to move at will.

The second thing you do is – and this is irony – you borrow from the script of people like supporters of Darren Wilson. Let’s compare notes…

"He shouldn’t have been in the street"
It doesn’t matter

"He should have listened to the cop"
It doesn’t matter

"They say he stole so he was in the mindset to resist arrest"
It doesn’t matter

"Cops are trained to shoot to kill. He couldn’t help it it was reflex.."
Are you seeing the terrifying parallel? IT DOESN’T MATTER.

Brothers. Recognize wrong and stand up for what’s right. Whatever happened between them and whatever they did to patch things up is irrelevant to the fact that no man has business hitting (let alone knocking out) any woman over a spat. He should regard the use of his body against her as lethal force and exercise restraint above all else.

Also stop sipping your damn tea.

IT IS YOUR BUSINESS

When one of our sisters is hurt, abused or in peril it’s OUR business. Because when somebody has us jammed against a car with 5 or 6 weapons drawn at us they sure as hell make it their business to monitor record and speak out. They throw themselves in peril to see us safe –– and you can’t manage as much as a a supportive facebook post?!

GTFOH. I mean it. we don’t need that sh*t in our community.

"

Julian Long

(H/T Karen Parker)

(Source: sonofbaldwin)

September 10, 2014
EXTENDED September 15 DEADLINE FOR: INCITE! Women and Trans People of Color Against Violence COV4 Call for Proposals - Beyond the State: Inciting Transformative Possibilities

SEPTEMBER 15, 2014 DEADLINE

"This gathering will provide an opportunity for individuals and groups to problem-solve ongoing challenges and share promising strategies. We are open to workshops on any theme that is in keeping with INCITE!’s mission to address the intersections of interpersonal, state, and institutional violence, and welcome a variety of formats: performances, participatory workshops, learning labs, story circles, open discussions, strategy sessions, activist studios, network gatherings, etc."

http://www.colorofviolence.org/submit-proposal.html

 

September 10, 2014
"

I completely understand the need and desire to protect Janay Rice’s privacy. I am deeply struggling with many people solely viewing her brutal and vicious attack as a “private matter between husband and wife.” But, I won’t debate about that.

I am curious, however, why many people are not equally as outspoken about the videos that expose vicious forms of White supremacist violence — Ersula Ore, Eric Garner, Marlene Pinnock— to name a few? Is it because they/their families are not protesting the circulation of the videos on the internet or is it because domestic violence is viewed as a private matter and white supremacist violence is not?

"

Aishah Shahidah Simmons

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